About your Search

20120928
20121006
STATION
FBC 54
LANGUAGE
English 54
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 54 (some duplicates have been removed)
-speech and is with fire the foundation for individual rights and education. hadley, you were not very political. what happened? >> i have opinions but struggled what i believe, when to speak up, and when to be quiet. john: the because of friends ? >> there were a variety of students that were very mature but others who could be loudmouth that overshadows the culture with a small group to make a lot of noise it can be intimidating. congressmen tom 10 credo was invited but the speech never happened. john: he has positions on immigration that you disagree. i am not in alignment with his philosophy and every issue. tax policy but not by to buy another issues. i was not present the day they shutdown the event but many were shouting there is no debate. no-space 48. that hit home. >> he was shouted down. john: somewhere outside the building and throwing rocks through the window? >> university reacted and condemned the action. unc denounce. but some people did not want to have the debate. some think my views are so illegitimate i should not say them. john: you go to campuses around the country. most illibera
, everybody pays for education, and every year they get worse education and it costs more. we've dumbed down our school program to rush kids through the system. why not do it the other way? why not had let the achieving kids rush through the system and get away from this burgeoning ed accuracy? beyond that, we're spending money on things that aren't being productive for our economy. let these achieving students, send them the message that if you achieve you will be rewarded. the idea we're going to get any of this taxpayer money back is kind of a mirage. taxpayers never get any money back. it will move on to the next boondoggle. i think it's a good idea. >> half of property taxes go to schools to be fair. tracy, the kids issue, you can get them out of your house two years earlier. what do you make about that? >> you know what, the money issue to me is separate from the academic development issue. i don't think these kids should be rushed through school. i do think there's a reason they need these years to develop as people. when you do look at the dollars and cents, there are a lot of people
is really to educate the commissioners and staff and to start focusing on some sensible ways in which some of these technology glitches can be capped ended. gerri: educate the staff. high-frequency trading has been around for awhile. it seems to me these folks should know everything about it. why don't they? >> i think there is clearly a lag time between when government becomes aware of technological advances and when it starts to understand them fully. i'm not justifying the time frame that has gone on because we have had these problems, as you pointed out, for over two years now. but i think the government is well advised to proceed only when it knows what it is actually doing, rather than just jumping into the freight. gerri: a point. and here's what they will talk about tomorrow, preventing errors in trading car responding to market crises once they have occurred, so it will take this on with people who are inside the industry and people who are critics of the industry. how should they go about either regulating this or changing it or fixing it because you know as well as i do that inv
regulations that we'll be better off. i've got a different view. i think we've got to invest in education and training. i think it's important for us to develop new sources of energy here in america, that we change our tax code to make sure that we're helping small businesses and companies that are investing here in the united states, that we take some of the money that we're saving as we wind down two wars to rebuild america. and that we reduce our deficit in a balanced way that allows us to make these critical investments. now, it ultimately is going to be up to the voters, to you, which path we should take. are we going to double down on the top-down economic policies that helped to get us into this mess, or do we embrace a new economic patriotism that says america does best when the middle class does best? and i'm looking forward to having that debate. >> moderator: governor romney, two minutes. romney: thank you, jim. i'm pleased to be at the university of denver, appreciate their welcome and also the presidential commission on these debates. and congratulations to you, mr. president
to cut education funding. kneel nemo all right. we clipped the first part of that, but the president was referring to the comment from mitt romney get the government out of the whole college loan business or cutback on it, that kids could go to their parents, ask for money for college, and that was something that the president really zeroed in on. mitt romney said that was not what he meant and all of that, but he came back with the comment, you're not entitled to your own facts. ed, you were watching this very, very closely, former mcdonald's usa ceo. o delivered the goods tonight? >> wow. the american people won clearly, but romney really brought it home. you can see it very clearly. do you want to double down on the failed policies of obama, or do you want to embrace a clear vision from a businessman that has leadership skills, strategic vision, and can take the country where it needs to go? as a small business guy who used to run a billion dollar company, i tell you, it's miserable right now. if obama thinks for a minute we're not going to find ways around the health care bill, h
, two the other they think he wants to do, he wanted to invest in education and training programs. that's all well and good, brenda and we know that's going to cost millions and millions of dollars, but that's not how the economy works. >> gary b, it's spending more, what does that do to the debt? >> well, brenda, he tries to get up, up, up. when i went to work for ibm 30-odd years ago, the government didn't teach me how computers work. bem caught me. rockefeller's oil company taught people how to drill for oil and gas and the third thing that strikes me that's not going to work. he wants to double manufacturing jobs, increase manufacturing jobs, that's fine, but why does the manufacturing get the benefit of government largest, why not the financial sector, oil and gas, all of this stuff drives the debt sky high and we know that the government can't spend money efficiently, it's just wrong. >> and jonas, there are also some tax hikes here, and wouldn't that do something to decrease the deficit? >> yes, it's the only specific tax increase that-- of both candidates and if you would close
now with more, consumer education director for credit dot com. thank you for joining us. how widespread is it? how often does it happen that your credit score as the consumer is different than a score your lender is looking at? >> well, almost 100 percent of the time because typically consumers do not get this course that lenders are using, unless they have already applied for credit and been turned down or charge more for credit, then a disclosure is required, but what most of us are doing is going online, getting an education credit score which can be helpful but is not necessarily the same score the lender is using. lori: so why should i spend a right to purchase by credit score if it is now with the lenders getting anywhere? >> it's a great question. of course we give a free credit score. we know what you spend that money. i think what consumers need to look at is, what is the information telling me about my credit worthiness. what can i improve and what can to improve? you can avenges court. lori: and as to what your saying, but i just want to give money. i want to borro
revitalization expected from a brand new revenue generated casino. what is the education system is facing problems? liz claman is there live. liz: all of those great new business products and prospects. so much of that has come because of an organization. the partnership has been unbelievable. then, you have the mayor who feels he would give up all of this just to get the kids a great education here in the cleveland public schools which is notorious for having big problems. we want to introduce mayor frank jackson got the democratic mayor of cleveland, along with joe roman. anyway, you have two separate missions. he is big on business. you are big on education. they both need money to make it happen. how are you working together we met i view it as one mission. the success in both. either one being unsuccessful will damage the other. liz: by the way, born and raised in cleveland. >> yes 11 and so are you. >> and plan to stay here as well. liz: you have to be proud of all the jobs. >> yes, we are. this is a casino that is coming to our downtown. saying we are not here to build a fortress,
will be in the red by a billioo dollars next year and another frightening number, 71 fed out of every education dollar in illinois goes to paying teacher retirement costs, how can they justify that amount of money? >> people who care deeply about education in illinois and around the country really needs to understand the only way you'll have the kind of resources for public education, for health care, is in the public employee unions come to the negotiating table and writes down the overly generous packages the average teacher who retired last jun june 2011 with a 30-year career had $1.6 million in cash when retired. the median income is $30,203, just an unfair burden on working class people. ashley: do you think this issue is getting a lot of play in the presidential campaign? i unfunded pension liabilities is a massive, massive problem but i get a sense it is not getting that much attention. >> i would be surprised and asked about it tomorrow night, but they absolutely should. very bad decisions, tarp, the auto bailout and of course the stimulus in january 2009 were crisis decisions. reporter
the private sector? >> on average 40% for architecture and engineering as one cat goir. education, training, library services and then the other was protective services. i know again there is difference what you might say security guard or police officer and firefighter. architecture and engineer -- that is pretty common and similar. melissa: i could see, when you compare a police officer who's really out there with the life on the line carrying a gun or a fireman runing into a burning building versus somebody who is working security still doing a freight job i don't think that is necessarily that comparable. but with engineers and architects, how does anyone justify that? >> by the way in protective services are lifeguards. so it is a broad category to say the least. melissa: well. >> but so architects seem to be looking at the same kind of activities. on the other hand some of these government buildings are pretty nice because the taxpayers are paying for them, not the private sector. melissa: yeah. there were some places where you found the private sector was making a lot more than the p
to be the pensions, i told you sucking up 71-cents out of every education dollar in illinois. political theater indulged here did not address of unfunded teacher pensions. that is what i'm talking about that is me talking about the chicago teacher union settlement with rahm emanuel, and all of the political theater that and all of the political heater that attended, and as a to you at that time, it is all about, all about the pensions and the pensions pay for them. and the governor is now quoting the idea of a federal bailout of illinois mentioned that. can you believe this stuff? and mean, a little -- just all little decency here, folks. announcing the state's fiscal 2012 budget last year governor quinn said he would seek a federal guarantee of its unfunded liabilities. sounds harmless enough, but ask about it back then. the governor claimed to bailout language was a precaution. now he calls it a drafting error. others try to call it a trial balloon. how big is the illinois problem? it has $8 billion in current outstanding debt. 8 billion. you say, okay. 8 billion. we live in a land of $16 tri
our education up to speed. you are looking for chemists. are we turning out enough ms ms they need dramatic improvement. many of us who are active in the city and region, both that the primary level and secondary level with science education. liz: how do we get people to be interested in science and engineering? >> it takes good curriculum, good teachers and good schools. as we all know, teachers can make all the difference in turning on student curiosity. it really takes a whole number of things to really come together. liz: how to look at what is happening today? unemployment dropped to 7.8%. on the surface, it looks good, some people question it. what do you see out there in the trenches as a business leader? >> well, in all honesty, there are a lot of people who are unemployed, there are actually quite a few who are underemployed. there is no question the economy is not creating as many good, solid high-paying jobs. liz: they always ask business people what the problem is and they say uncertainty. >> i do not think it is as much uncertainty. you have to have an increase in dema
factory direct. >> we were factory direct because we had to educate people. we had to educate people how using whole foods. the people get it. whole smoothie trend is growing at incredible right. i just got numbers. in month of september, 43% of house heads had a smoothie and prepared a smoothie in their home. on average, that is 250 million smoothies were made. >> we love smoothies i want to get back to the working with a group like amazon. are you competing with them and their discounts because they discount pretty deeply. >> right now the demand for people wanting the vita-mix is so strong we have to be in as many doors as possible. interesting thing it is not all, there is vita-mix for you as consumer. if you are high-end consumer and love to cook and love the recipes from the chef you will shop in williams-sonoma. that is where you find the perfect vita-mix for you. if you're looking at deal for amazon that will get a great deal to fit. >> we're profiling like the hope diamond. it is up there. 500 bucks, jody for a blender. what does it do that is so great? why do i need that instea
it rests on public education and the problems in it and if it shine as light on it and does that and makes people talk about it that's a good thing. david: there have been fictionalized accounts on stories based on reality, like lean on me. morgan freeman film and "stand and deliver". this has been done before. i was a public school teacher in chicago and i debt with the unions. i dealt with the whole public school bureaucracy. it is a mess. this film does not necessarily fictionalize the degree to which the public school system is a mess. i think that is why people will be able to identify with it. >> yes. definitely. they identify with the problem. the solution, i'm not sure they identify with. they identify with the players, the big institutionalized bureaucracy and individual moms and dads trying to get a better education for their kids and the problem, that is the central core of the film. on the other hand, you have to recognize really, look at it, honestly and say, that it does simplify a very complex problem. david: it does and it doesn't. sometimes you have to say flat-out this sy
at sustainably good returns for savers. without a job, people won't be able to buy a home or pay for an education ire irrespective of te current level of interest rates. >> saying the federal reserve is watching inflation, has the tools to combat it. he says it's not an issue right now. he also discussed milton friedman saying ben bernanke is a fan of mil torks saying freedman would have supported the feds aggressiveness and targeting of liquidity. he said back in 2009, the reason he believes that is because freedman says japan should by securities back in 2000. ben bernanke, a fan, and says he would be supportive of the current fed today. david: i was a friend of milton, and ben bernanke is no milton, i can tell you that. thank you so much.3 better economic news pushed the markets up, but does the rally really have legs? lauren: joining us a john manly, wells fargo chief equity strategist, and in the pits of the cme, scott bower senior market strategist. hey, guys. >> hello. >> how are you? lauren: why didn't we hold the highs of the session? what's this manufacturing report? okay, we're not shr
to incorporate responsibility. education is the main reason people spend money around the world. >> about 21 transactions a second. we moved about $150 billion yearly. the main reason for the people moving money from one country to another country is education, supporting their loved ones, sending money every transaction. sending the people back to school. sending their children back to school. about 61 million children worldwide that have no access to education. to support that, we made a commitment saying from the money standing, those that have made a commitment thing we would like to pull the people back to school. giving the children the opportunity to create economy growth worldwide. a million days of school for the children. up to $10,000 a day. it is a huge commitment. customers tell us that they knew that. lori: tell me about the amount of money being sent around the world and the pace that is moving. >> it does help us a lot. 2009 crisis -- we already knew that job creation and investment the company went down. the money was sent less. we saw already in some countries that earn mon
to say. education costs different from medical facilities but the key thing is right now the traditional construction project only 20% of what gets put into the final building price point why is material. 40% is a risk and overhead. we want to reverse that equation. we are more like boeing. quality manufacturing and the attitude is if bowling can assemble a 737 in a matter of days why does it take 24 months to get health care clinic? ashley: how these structures come? i they and flat pack can you put it together? >> precisely. they're so important to us because that construction mean that is affordable to ship and we are not shipping boxes of air and we put panels up. imagine a high end building. it goes up quickly but we don't have to sacrifice on column free space for ceilings or daylight or air quality. it is that component approach that allows us to put something out that looks high end like it is the architecture. ashley: anyone else coming into the fold? >> largest health-care providers out there buying the buildings and the race for distributed health care and affordable health ca
education, medical research, you know aid to the poor, and et cetera, contribution to nonprofits. >> now we're getting off topic. >> that is a drop in the bucket. neil: jay, and dan, i want to thank you both it say mess, and getting messier, we'll have more after this. after [ thunder crashes ] [ female announcer ] some people like to pretend a flood could never happen to them. and that their homeowners insurance protects them. [ thunder crashes ] it doesn't. stop pretending. only flood insurance covers floods. ♪ visit floodsmart.gov/pretend to learn your risk. for many, nexium helps relieve heartburn symptoms caused by acid reflux disease. osteoporosis-related bone fractures and low magnesium levels have been seen with nexium. possible side effects include headache, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. other serious stomach conditions may still exist. talk to your doctor about nexium. wildfires were getting close to homes. at that moment, i got my first taste of just how important the guard is. announcer: be there for your community, at nationalguard.com. neil: a lot of red states with republic
in massachusetts was not number one, right? and here is the deal. according to the national education report card in the year 2012, are we ready? massachusetts is number one, number one. number one. that's right. >> not when he was governor, not when he was governor. when he was governor it worked. >> the point is he turned it around. >> i'm glad we're talking about his record as governor. i'm very happy with the job he did with health care. talk about that. lou: you know what, may be on your show, but on this one what we will talk about is how this translates to vote on november 6th because obama got his tail kicked, as i said earlier. what does this mean for the future? the future being defined as between now and november. >> the republicans had a mess of the enthusiasm that going into this first debate. a little bit of concern on the conservative side among the best that romney was not being tough and aggressive enough in taking it to barack obama. the polling was showing he was a head or at the very least the race was tight. what will happen now is the momentum is changing. i'm hearing from a
programs. >> nutrition, job training, education, health care. wouldn't it make sense just have for? think about this. john: make everybody work to be eligible. >> we had a bill introduced two weeks ago where we said let's put in the work component for food stamps. let's establish the critical link that helps americans get to their goals and dreams. let's have a work requirement. john: the truly hopeless of a mother with six kids. how is she going to work in to care for kids? >> it will be willing to help those individuals. we will help those who can work it in the skills they need, required that. it's like a anything else. many have a requirement it influences behavior and of to do to a better experience and life style. >> i certainly agree with you. according to some politicians when more people get food stamps and provide more funding for food stamps. john: create jobs with food stamps. >> it would be laughable. making that statement. it's wrong on two counts. you're taking money from someone else. redistributing and giving it to someone else. that's always a problem. the government act
that the president's agenda of investment in education, more math and science teachers, help for manufacturing in the u.s., reducing oil dependency and balance much trade deficit. melissa: all you've done is talking points. you haven't answer ad single question. we're out of time. could you anticipates one of the questions. >> melissa, here is the facts. the facts are, more people are going back to work. the unemployment rate is 7.8%. this is looking very much like 1984 and ronald reagan. unemployment down, people back to work. melissa: thanks for coming on the show. we appreciate your time. >> my pleasure. melissa: so there is big divide in the jobs data today, as we're discussing household survey shows total employment surged 873,000, but payroll says only 114,000 people went back to work. even jack welch said it, hard to reconcile these numbers. he tweeted, unbelievable jobs numbers. these chicago guys will do anything. can't debate so they change the numbers. that is harsh criticism. here with me is economist peter morici. which also have gary burtless, senior fellow? [no audio. what do yo
of work for four years. a lot of people have left the job market permanently and people not educated now to take those particular jobs so those jobs are gone forever. i have personal experience that i talked about before of trying to find a patternmaker. the garment center no longer exists in new york. you don't find pattern makers any more. the job went overseas and so did the work. amazing. connell: the of this thing in these statistics, 870,000 jobs in the household survey is a huge number but historically ridiculously volatile, two thirds of them were part-time jobs. 582,000 americans taking part-time positions. a lot of those people would rather be working full time but many would rather be working full time. if you are mitt romney talking about a few minutes of terrific week in the debate and they say he won the debate. does this change his strategy or his conversation? i am back, the debate, took it to the president and now we have a jobs report where the president can saying the getting better? >> you can say things are getting better but it is a relative thing. after four years
's education system. melissa: so pessimistic. be sure to watch this weekend. you can't catch it at seven and 10:00 p.m. on saturday and on sunday at 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. eastern. that is all the "money" we have for you today. happy friday. have a wonderful weekend. we will be back right here on monday. "the willis report" with lori rothman is coming up next. lori: regulation nation. it will take a look at a new study showing how government red tape is putting our country at a competitive disadvantage. plus, president obama gets a boost in the polls. the romney camp plays down expectations for next week's debate. some predictions. welcome to "the willis report."
the title of a movie. is the title of our nation's education system. melissa: so pessimistic. be sure to watch this weekend. you can't catch it at seven and 10:00 p.m. on saturday and on sunday at 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. eastern. that is all the "money" we have for you today. happy friday. have a wonderful weekend. we will be back right here on monday. bought early in the year. now sales are soft. there are many variations. there has been offered every variation to explain. but like my grades and they are what they are and for a recovery is not good. if you inherited them or not. john: tonight weir at the and old trial liberal campus university of north carolina at chapel hill. the word freshman is disparaged it is sexist. and the code says explicitly implicitly asking for sex is against the code. what does that say against
an important role to play in education. i mean, i really -- i had to choke when he said that. other than that, i thought what he said is going to play well across the entire base. neil: he didn't put a limit on it, but he did -- >> he said less regulation, which is the right language. i mean, how much less? i question what happens when he gets to dc. i don't have -- neil: turn on him in a second. >> that's the point. our job is to keep guys like mitt romney in line when they actually sit down in the seat. neil: i'll give you credit, mark, you are consistent, don't waiver, and like the little worms and, oh, man. you're not like that. >> thank you. neil: all right. campaign cash spent, $233 million. 30 days of debate prep, 60 million. winning by a mile in the mile high state? priceless. ♪ >> announcer: meet mary. she loves to shop online with her debit card, and so does bill, an identity thief who stole mary's identity, took over her bank accounts and stole her hard-earned money. now meet jack. after 40 years, he finally saved enough to enjoy retirement. angie, the waitress at jack's favorite
with the educational system. my son tells me all the time and told when is he goes to school then they he do this. teachers taking digs at the republicans and it's amazing how to indoctrinate our kids at an early age and despicable and should be illegal. stuart: back to first principles, should any school go to school wearing a political shirt? >> absolutely. stuart: that's legit. >> absolutely. it's better than the game shirts. >> i had to make my son take his shirt back, out the store and check out the shirt u' got to be kidding. >> and i like schools with uniforms. stuart: thank you much indeed. >> in japan they've done it forever, i think it's smart. you don't have any class warfare, envy and go to school and learn. >> a nice blue plaid uniform. >>, but in a country of free speech. romney-ryan or obama-biden t-shirt. but to liken the republican shirt to the kkk. >> it's sick. >> i think we're in agreement ladies and gentlemen, this friday morning, one thing that did not come up in wednesday's debate to the surprise of many was mitt romney's comment about the 47%, and new at 10, romney calls t
to be successful and economy has 70% of the it based on consumers driving pricing and value we'll have to educate consumers how to buy it. today the wrong people pay for it and wrong people buy it. businesses pay for it, government pays for it and insurance companies buy it. we have no consumer engaged in the game to understand value. david: you know what milton friedman used to say? the best way to find a price for something take out the middleman. you have the service provider and service resee every, did receiver, those two make a deal. we have so many middlemen including much bigger government proehl than we ever had before. >> this was started by medicare in '65, incented every hospital or provider to establish their own costs for the very same procedures. david: how do we get better pricing into the system. >> we have to make it transparent. therefore for consumers to be engaged they have to know what they're buying. david: by the way, one anecdote. lawyer rein has hers. i have mine. my wife was in the hospital for quite a bit of time. she had 10 physical therapy sessions eeach one cost 150
: food stamps, free phone from the obama administration, free medical care, free education, go to college. >> yes,. >> the american way. >> whether it is appropriate and not as a great topic for debate, but it's clear that is a lot today. it is probably clear that most folks, here are aware in some form of the existence of the law stuart: yes, they are aware. i immigrated nearly 38 years ago. i was not aware of any such law. >> i can't imagine you came here for welfare. >> i didn't. stuart: have never taken anything from the government. it astonishes me. you think this is the american way. >> poor children in need health care and education, you don't say you don't give to our schools because of a child of illegal immigrants. stuart: food stamps. >> beating. eating. yes. stuart: all you have to do is get across that border legally or illegally. set foot, set foot right there. you can't be sent back. >> try and arbitrate this a little bit. this is based on children. the supreme court case is based on children. the state of texas was not allowed to punish children because of the misdeeds of
on education but most important of all he presented an optimistic view of america's future. growth and prosperity. optimism. isn't that what we all want? i've been a superintendent for 30 some years at many different park service units across the united states. the only time i've ever had a break is when i was on maternity leave. i have retired from doing this one thing that i loved. now, i'm going to be able to have the time to explore something different. it's like another chapter. ♪ stuart: american airlines pulls 47 planes for inspection after a third incident involving loose seats. they are blaming it on an improperly installed seat locking mechanism. moving on. from the wall street journal, borrowing from the obama campaign that mitt romney has an identical twin. whoever that guy representing the gop ticket was in denver has just given united states a real presidential election at last. that was the first line from a column this morning. dan joins us now. you stayed up all the way to the night. i know you did. you were not expecting that, were you? >> stuart, no one was exp
the economy, and undermind your state's ability to pay for important services like education, like investment and infrastructure. it's as simple as that. neil: mayor, thanks for the patients. >> thank you. neil: always very good. the fact of the matter is, you know, democrat or republican, we talk here on this business show. it's about being pragmatic, moving the ball forward. a city like los angeles, tough run to run. he's done -- he's done just that. this is the seat of the debate hall right now where we are about 25 minutes away from the candidates entering that room, and they will begin the first of what will be four presidential debates. a lot at stake. for mitt romney, but i could argue just as much for the president. remember, it's the president who kind of enters this like the heavy weight champ because he's the president and everyone expects him to do good because, well, he's the president. he's had this job for better part of three and a half years so he's going to be good at it. always be a surprise if he with weren't. mitt romney is the other guy who was -- who had 20 some odd deb
after a decade of public education don't have what it takes. here is my take on basic job skills which are sadly lacking. show up for the interview on time. put on a clear and -- clean pair of hands and don't show your underwear. that goes for young women too. baseball caps come off in the wars. brooke your prospect of the employer in the eye. smile modestly and shake hands. you do not hug. use good grammar. demonstrate that you can hold a conversation. if you get the job, keep it. show up every day to work on time stone cold sober. no liquor on your breath and no rabbi from we did. get along with your co-workers. don't in gauging gossip. that is a short sign of a small mind. did not call in sick unless you are really sick. look for extra responsibility. if you public-school didn't teach you to do simple math learned. if you can't read easily practice. get your head straight. you want to move up the food chain. those of ambition. one last one. if you have got a tattoo don't show it. if it is on your face you are screwed. >> friday, the highlight reel. roll it, please. >> oil companies
where we will be. make sure our kids are educated so they are able to contribute to a strong economy. we have to make sure we are doing the right investment we need to have a strong economy. a future orientation, not always looking backwards. i think it is an important thing for economic oc makers to think about as well. >> so, a lot of questions about the dollar. i guess the best way to some of these questions would be, what are your concerns about the value of the dollar and maybe related to have the various quantitative easing effort at some point, was a drive down the value of the dollar? >> when people talk about the dollar, they often confusing two very different ideas. i think it is important to him and wish them a little bit. the first idea is the buying power of the dollar. how much can the dollar buy in terms of goods and services when you go to the grocery store, you know, when you go to the mall, where ever you are shopping. the measure of the dollar that matters for that definition is inflation. i talked about inflation in my speech. inflation in the united states has been a
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 54 (some duplicates have been removed)